Click for NEWS Click for SPORTS Click for ACCENT Click for OPINION Click for OBITUARIES Click for CALENDAR Click for CLASSIFIEDS Click for ARCHIVES Click for SPECIALSECTIONS
Subscribe  •  Business Directory  •  Recipes  •  The Stroller  •  Weddings  •  School Menus  •  Community Links  •  VA Lottery  •  Contact Us
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
News Search   

CARLISLE - Click for Website
Mckinney tower - Click for Website

Martinsville Bulletin, Inc.
P. O. Box 3711
204 Broad Street
Martinsville, Virginia 24115
276-638-8801
Toll Free: 800-234-6575

NELSON AUTO - Click for Website
State moves to restore civil rights
For thousands of felons in Va.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

RICHMOND (AP) — The door opened Monday for tens of thousands of nonviolent felons in Virginia to regain the right to vote, with state officials outlining the steps each will have to take to recapture their basic civil rights.

Gov. Bob McDonnell has said up to 100,000 disenfranchised felons ultimately could be added to the voter rolls, serve on a jury or hold political office.

“For past offenders, our goal is to grant civil rights back to as many as possible,” McDonnell said in a statement. “This is the right thing to do for all Virginians to help make the commonwealth a safer and better place.”

A former prosecutor and attorney general, McDonnell said by offering past offenders an opportunity to resume their lives as productive citizens, “we can better keep them from committing another crime and returning to prison.” He called that step a move to thwart “prison expansion” and to promote “smart government.”

The task will not be easy. The state has no database of past felons and no electronic records were kept before 1995.

Secretary of the Commonwealth Janet Kelly said the “biggest challenge” has involved locating felons who have been out of the system for years or decades.

“We could easily find the felons who were currently in the system or who had previously expressed an interest in getting their rights back,” Kelly said.

For the 500 to 700 felons who complete their sentences each month in the state, basic rights are to be automatically restored, provided they satisfy other requirements.

The state has added four workers in the Secretary of the Commonwealth to help process requests and locate others, aided by some added funding and upgraded technology. The state will also work with such groups as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the American Civil Liberties Union to reach out to nonviolent felons.

The Advancement Project, one of the groups that worked with the state, said it was committed with them to helping spread the word. “Today marks the beginning of more Virginians having their voting and other civil rights restored than ever before,” said the group’s co-director, Judith Brown Dianis.

For nonviolent offenders to retain their civil rights, they must have completed their prison sentences, probation or parole; have no outstanding fines, restitution or court costs; and have no pending felony charges.

In Virginia, only the governor can restore a felon’s civil rights. McDonnell had already streamlined the process and has restored the rights of more than 5,000 felons, more than any other previous administration.

While McDonnell had already eliminated a two-year waiting period for nonviolent felons, felons convicted of a violent crime will still have to wait five years and apply to regain their civil rights.

The Sentencing Project, a rights advocacy group, estimates that about 350,000 Virginians remained disenfranchised in 2010.

Advocates said the state also should work to restore the civil rights to violent offenders.

“We encourage our next governor to expand upon McDonnell’s legacy and ensure that even more Virginians are eligible to vote,” said Tram Nguyen of the Virginia New Majority, one group active on the issue.

Some advocates had expressed concern that two offenses — burglary and breaking and entering of an unoccupied dwelling — would be classified as violent felonies.

The process outlined Monday, however, would keep most of those crimes in the nonviolent category, except in instances where there is an element of violence, such as intent to commit bodily harm.

The Secretary of the Commonwealth’s office has a contact form on its website http://www.commonwealth.virginia.gov/ that’s also available at probation and parole offices. By Aug. 1, a web-based form will allow for a direct submission of restoration or rights and a toll-free number (1-855-575-9177) has been established for those without computer access.

———

Steve Szkotak can be reached on Twitter at http://twitter.com/sszkotakap.

 

 
A-CO - Click for Website
The Spencer Group - Click for Website
New College Institute - Click for Website
Martinsville/Henry Co. Chamber of Commerce - Click for Website
The Eye Site - Click for Website
West Piedmont Workforce Investment Board - Click for Website
PHCC - Click for Website
Mckinney button - Click for Website
Joe Cobbe CPA - Click for Website
Rives S. Brown Realtors - Click for Website